Suzanne

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • in reply to: About appliance choice for patient with jaw problem #1027
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    There could be several reasons for the discomfort from using the Sleep Appliance…
    The patient could be advanced to far which can cause pain. If this is the case the patients VDO may need to be increased. Also, is the patient wearing the AM positioned each evening Before the appliance placed in the mouth and also in the morning when the appliances removed. All three of the above could be a reason for the discomfort the patient may feel. Please let me know if I can help in any other way. Thank you

    in reply to: best device #1026
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    The best device depends on the patient. That is why the STATDDS Sleep and Bruxism Hime Sleep Monitor is a much needed tool in all dentist’s toolbox… you have the ability to evaluate the patient’s grinding/ clenching to guide the dentist in the best device. For instance, a Somnomed is a wonderful appliance … but with the STATDDS that would help you decide on Flex wings or not… depending on the amount of bruxism occurs in that patient. Also, if the patient has short teeth, less retention and/or undercuts . Hope this helps.

    in reply to: Which sleep test to have analyzed #697
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Eric~

    Her baseline indicates she has Mild OSA (5-15). The American Academy of Sleep Medicine allows patients with Mild and Moderate OSA to be treated with an Oral Sleep Appliance. The CPAP is the Gold Standard for severe… If the patient is severe and can not tolerate the CPAP, then the patient can be treated with an Oral Sleep Appliance.

    Having a baseline is important when treating patients, then doing a follow up at the fourth month appointment so you can confirm efficiency of the appliance. She has improved greatly- Why would you want to put her on a CPAP now?

    The dream Tap is a fantastic appliance because it allows 15mm of movement. You need to adjust the appliance and you can more than likely improve the results. You may need to pull her forward and /or adjust her VDO. Have you educated the patient on how to adjust her appliance with the key??

    Look forward to hearing from you.

    in reply to: Which sleep test to have analyzed #696
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Eric~

    Her baseline indicates she has Mild OSA (5-15). The American Academy of Sleep Medicine allows patients with Mild and Moderate OSA to be treated with an Oral Sleep Appliance. The CPAP is the Gold Standard for severe… If the patient is severe and can not tolerate the CPAP, then the patient can be treated with an Oral Sleep Appliance.

    Having a baseline is important when treating patients, then doing a follow up at the fourth month appointment so you can confirm efficiency of the appliance. She has improved greatly- Why would you want to put her on a CPAP now?

    The dream Tap is a fantastic appliance because it allows 15mm of movement. You need to adjust the appliance and you can more than likely improve the results. You may need to pull her forward and /or adjust her VDO. Have you educated the patient on how to adjust her appliance with the key??

    Look forward to hearing from you.

    in reply to: What appliance best in lieu of Narval #445
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    The dreamTAP and EMA from Glidewell are both efficent and comfortable appliances.

    in reply to: Help #444
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Send me an email to haley.suzanne@comcast.net and I can provide information regarding that, if interested.

    in reply to: BCBS and Dental PPO #443
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    You are not in Network with BCBS. Your patient will need to fill out a Gap Exception…unless the patient has a HMO plan with BCBS.

    in reply to: Deductible verbiage #442
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Many times the patients deductibles are so high and never met- that a great solution is to offer a CASH price for the appliance. The patients are very receptive to this solution. This can not be used to go toward the deductible.

    in reply to: Medicare Fees #441
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Medicare pays according to your jurisdiction.You do not bill Medicare until after delivery of the appliance( approved lab) and the delivery form is signed.

    in reply to: Medical Insurance billing for bruxism appliance #440
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    You will need to use Dental codes for a night guard.

    The code J0585 for Therapeutic Botox needs to be filed under Medical Insurance , if it is covered in the plan. Also, make sure you have detailed SOAP notes.

    in reply to: Rx for Sleep apnea appliance #439
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    The prescription form may come from the HST test monitor. StatsDDS monitor has a form in the software you can print. A Medical doctor can also provide one for you.

    in reply to: Fee for oral sleep appliance and insurance billing #438
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Everyone charges different prices. Think of the price for the appliances as you did when you priced your crowns, implants, dentures. Range of prices across the board: $1500-$6000.
    Medical Insurances pay different amounts…according to insurance plans, coverage’s, deductibles, in or out of network, e.t.c. that being said the portion covered by the medical insurance depends on all of the above.

    Have you taken a Medical Billing course? There are also third party Medical Companies that can assist you on your journey

    in reply to: Sending patients home with the apnea/bruxism monitor… #437
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Everyone has their own system in regards with charging for the StatDDS monitor. In the beginning, I did not charge because (96% of the time I was guaranteed an appliance of some type). If you are testing for the bruxism/clenching, I believe $25 is a fair price. However, if you are having a Sleep Study read you may decide to charge more to include the cost of the diagnosis. You can charge Medical Insurance for the StatDDS

    in reply to: Botox/Sleep apnea #435
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Botox will be very beneficial for your patient for the bruxism. Are you treating patients in your practice who have been diagnosed with Sleep Appliance or referring these patients? If treating, which appliance are you choosing for your patient to treat her OSA?

    in reply to: oat somnomed choice #434
    Suzanne
    Moderator

    Your patient has Mild OSA 5-15. Why have you chosen a Somnomed for the appliance?
    Also, what is the parafunction-grinding/clenching? This also comes into play when choosing the right appliance for your patient.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)